Elephant Pepper camp: The Lowdown

Ellie Pepper, or, to give it it’s full title, Elephant Pepper Camp, is one of a cluster of excellent luxury tented camps located outside the main Mara Reserve in the Mara North Conservancy. Its location gives it the advantage of being a little quieter than the central reserve, so when you stumble across one of the Masai Mara’s many big cats, you’re unlikely to be sharing the experience.

What’s Elephant Pepper Camp really like?

Tucked amongst the trees there are eight traditional canvas safari tents, and one larger tent that’s used for honeymooners or families travelling together. The Elephant Pepper tents are comfortable, but not over the top, giving your whole safari a timeless feel. There are rich rugs on the floor, carved wooden or iron beds, and ensuite bathrooms with flushing eco loos and bucket showers. Elephant Pepper has LED lights for the few hours when you’re in your tent after dark, but with the cosy chairs of the mess tent, and the lure of the camp fire in the evenings, you may well find yourself elsewhere. At night, after an early evening drink gazing into the flames, there are jolly, often communal, dinners, where you’ll share your day’s adventures with your safari guides and fellow guests.

What can I do at Elephant Pepper Camp?

By day you’ll head out onto the savannah for early morning and late afternoon game drives in large open 4 wheel drive vehicles. There are also walking safaris on the Mara North Conservancy, meals out in the bush, and a chance to visit the Maasai community. For an extra special treat, there’s also the chance to arrange a hot air balloon flight (at an additional cost) so you start your day floating gently over the bush, watching the sun rise before your champagne breakfast..

Giving Back at Elephant Pepper Camp:

Elephant Pepper’s owners were amongst the pioneering founders of the Mara North Conservancy, which protects over 70,000 acres and ensures a regular income for over 800 Maasai landowners. It’s also won a Gold eco-tourism rating for its environmental practices, which include only using solar power and recycling rubbish.

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