Baraza, Zanzibar: The Lowdown

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Baraza’s one of the (very) few hotels on Zanzibar that we think truly lives up to its five-star status. This lovely villa-only hotel is on one of Zanzibar’s most beautiful beaches, facing east into the rising sun. We were incredibly impressed with how it managed both welcoming children and providing the level of comfort and luxury to suit the most adult of guests.

What’s Baraza like?
There are 30 large villas, each with their own sitting room, bathroom and outdoor plunge pool. One bedroomed villas are the ones closest to the Indian Ocean (tip from us: pick ocean view over ocean front for greater privacy) while the two bedroomed villas are a little further back from the beach. The cream and gold décor has definite hints of Arabia, reflecting Zanzibar’s history as an Omani outpost. When we visited, food here was fresh and mouthwatering. Evening meals have a different location and theme each night, from a beachside barbeque to glamorous gourmet dining, and there’s a positively slinky cocktail bar for your evening sundowner.

What can I do at Baraza?

Baraza has a spa for those in need of serious pampering , a well-equipped watersports centre, and a kids club for younger guests. There’s a tennis court, gym (deserted when we visited, but if you must exercise on holiday, it’s nice to know it’s there) and a large pool for the hours when Zanzibar’s notoriously variable tide is out.

Feel good factor at Baraza?

Baraza and its sister hotels, Breezes Beach Club and the Palms, has  long worked to support the local community,  helping to fund a maternity unit and children’s clinic in Bwejuu, the nearby village. The clinic is always in need of donations, so if you would like to bring something with you, please ask us and we can let you know what’s needed most. Beyond this the charity Baraza for Bwejuu works throughout the year on community projects. Operating responsibly also means considering the environment- villas at Baraza are solar powered, there’s a desalination plant to minimise water use, and wherever possible supplies are purchased from the local villagers.

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