Grumeti Serengeti Tented Camp: The Lowdown

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Grumeti Serengeti Tented Camp is an authentic, rustic-luxury style tented camp, tucked beside a tributary of the Grumeti River. Wildlife wanders through camp by day and night, hippos grunt in the river and colobus monkeys sit high in the forest canopy.

What’s Grumeti Serengeti Tented Camp really like?

There are 10 ensuite safari tents, with soothing natural coloured décor (when we first visited this camp it was in gaudy shades of brightly coloured fabrics which were cheerful, but less in keeping with the bush). Each tent has an overhead fan for the hot Serengeti summers, and a verandah to perch on with a book or your binos. There is also a family tent, which is two tents linked by a canvas walkway. Food is generally good here, though unusually for Tanzania, meals are eaten in individual groups rather than communally. There is also a pool here, and massages can be arranged in your room- rather a treat after a long game drive or light aircraft flight.

What can I do at Grumeti Serengeti Tented Camp?

The main activity at Grumeti is game driving in the area around camp and the wider “western corridor” area. When the wildebeest migration passes through (usually some time in June) this is a spectacular spot to be. Outside migration season we’ve found game viewing to be a little quieter, but equally, it’s rewarding to be able to escape from the crowds elsewhere in the Serengeti. The crocs in the river here are also some of the largest we’ve seen anywhere in Africa. For an additional fee, you can also do early morning hot air balloon flights over the bush, and visits to nearby Lake Victoria (please just let us know as we would generally recommend advance booking).

Giving back at Grumeti Serengeti Tented Camp: The owners of the camp are serious about their commitment to the wildlife and the community. Grumeti’s guides are involved in monitoring eagle and vulture populations and the black and white colobus monkeys. They also help to promote a healthy lifestyle amongst the staff and the surrounding community, in particular helping to fight HIV.

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