Amanzi, Lower Zambezi: The Lowdown

Extraordinary Africa> Zambia> Lower Zambezi > Amanzi

Amanzi Camp is a gloriously serene tented camp in one of the finest game viewing areas of the Lower Zambezi. What more do you need to know?

What’s Amanzi really like?

Pleasingly, Amanzi has just four tents (and two of these are linked to make the family tent, so it’s really only three) making for an incredibly intimate atmosphere. The tents are large and comfortable, with en suite bathrooms, and an outside sitting area with stylish, but laid back and natural décor. Wooden walkways link the four tents to the main mess area where there are gorgeous views out over the channel and the river islands beyond. Pay attention: we wouldn’t be in the least surprised if you saw an ellie or two crossing the water as you’re swimming. In the mess you’ll eat your meal, sit back around the fire pit after a day in the bush, and relax with a cold drink on a hot afternoon.

What can I do at Amanzi?

We have always loved this area of the Lower Zambezi for the quality of the game viewing, and the park as a whole for the array of activities you can do there. As well as game drives, there are night drives (fabulous for spotting leopard and porcupines), gloriously tranquil kayak and boat safaris, and fishing. If you catch a tiger fish, please send us a photo so we can mount it on our growing wall of fame. For over 16s, Amanzi also offers the chance to do walking safaris.

Giving back at Amanzi… Safari in Zambia isn’t about showiness, it’s about substance. Amanzi was built from wood salvaged from a camp that the Zambezi washed away many seasons ago, and has been designed so that animals can freely wander under the walkways down to the water. Amanzi’s owners provide financial and anti-poaching support to Conservation Lower Zambezi. If you’d like to contribute to the overall conservation effort yourself- Amanzi works with Pack for a Purpose (just ask us for details) – when communities see the benefit of the wildlife and wilderness that helps to protect it.

Want to know more? Just

Ask the Africa Experts