A passionate defence of the Masai Mara

I’ve lost count of the number of times that people who “know” Africa have told me they don’t do Kenya. “Too busy darling. Daphne told me at dinner it’s simply overrun these days.” As I smile and nod, secretly I think “Poor you.”

Yes, it’s true. You can buy a package holiday from Britain, Germany, and most probably Italy to Mombasa. Yes, there are lodges in certain national parks that are a touch “mass market”. So why do “all” these people keep coming to Kenya, even the experienced safari-goers, the ones who’ve done hundreds of luxury safaris? Because it’s utterly wonderful.

Sundowners on a Luxury Safari in the Masai Mara

Sundowners in the Masai Mara from Elephant Pepper Camp

If you’ve explored Kenya as much as we have, you know what to avoid, and where to go. East African beaches are glorious, a fraction of the price of the Caribbean, and wonderfully warm in October when the much of the rest of the world’s sandy shores are shivering under a monsoon. And safari: do all those people who say safari in the Masai Mara’s been “done” never stop to think why so many wildlife documentaries are filmed there, why people travel across the world to spend a few days there and why more than one wildlife expert would choose to do their very last safari there? Could it be because the game viewing’s some of the best in Africa? And let’s be realistic. The best in Africa really means the best in the world.

Wildebeest Migration in the Masai Mara

The Masai Mara (image thanks to the lovely people at Offbeat Mara)

I love Kenya. I adore the Mara. I’ve probably been on safari to 30 or 40 game reserves (and that’s not counting some of the privately-owned tiddlers that count themselves as a “reserve”) and I still adore the Masai Mara. If you think it’s busy, fair enough- head to the utter wilderness of a walking safari in Zambia, the exclusive privacy of Botswana or the remoteness of western Tanzania. But if you want to see the Masai Mara’s ravishing rolling landscape, and the vast volumes of game it at their best, steer clear of the wildebeest migration and the busy season, and go when the cognoscenti go. Pick June, pick January, or pack your raincoat and pick April, May or November. Who cares if you get a bit wet? You’ll have amazing photos with spectacular light under looming atmospheric rain clouds, and best of all, parts of the world’s finest game reserve to yourself. An April guest at Governor’s Camp (smack bang in one of the Masai Mara’s best game viewing areas) stayed with just nine other guests in a camp which has around 30 tents, and a staff to guest ratio of 3:1.

Game drive in the Masai Mara

A game drive from Offbeat Mara Camp (they’re not even paying me- they just have great photos and it really is this good!)

And that’s just the Mara. What about safari in Laikipia, Meru, the Matthews Mountains and Lake Turkana (bet Daphne from the dinner party didn’t go there)? So, for anyone who thinks Kenya’s overrun, that’s OK- I’ll keep her best bits for me.