THANK YOU, doctors, nurses and healthcare workers: up to 70% off safari camps in Kenya and Tanzania

There’s a little known “special” in the safari world: residents’ rates.  Safari companies across Africa offer heavily discounted rates for local residents, so that they get to experience the natural wonders on their doorsteps. For many these would be unaffordable otherwise, and it means that camps can fill empty beds at the last minute or during low season. Not only this, but there’s a huge conservation benefit in local residents enjoying and appreciating the animals and landscape they might not otherwise see.

We are utterly thrilled to see one of our favourite safari collections extending residents rates as a thank you to doctors, nurses, and healthcare workers. This averages out at about a 70% discount on most camps. We are all so incredibly grateful for the work they have done, and know they will need a break more than most when this is all done.

In Kenya you can choose from lovely rustic Ol Pejeta Bush Camp for rhinos and activities, three fabulous camps in the Masai Mara (Rekero, Naboisho and Encounter Mara), and the Mara Bush Houses if you want to try out a family safari. We’ve earmarked these as an ideal first safari destination for the youngest member of the EA team.

Over the border in northern Tanzania you can choose from six gorgeous camps in the Serengeti. Olakira, Kimondo and Ubuntu are seasonal camps which broadly track the movements of the Great Migration. Sayari sits in splendour in the far north of the park, Dunia- famously staffed by an all-female team- and Namiri, in a splendid spot for big cats. If you want serious style, we’d find the Highlands at the Ngorongoro Crater a tough one to beat, though the walking in this area gets us even more excited than the lodge. A short distance from such a well-known safari spot, it feels incredibly wild, authentic, and unspoilt. As a last stop in northern Tanzania, you can also stay at Oliver’s Camp in Tarangire– a particular favourite for elephant-lovers during the dry season.

Heading further off the beaten track into Southern Tanzania, the wild and rugged Ruaha is one of our favourite parks in all of Africa. Here you can choose between rustic Kwihala or serious luxury at Jabali Ridge (have sampled, can confirm- very nice). Then for birding and boat safaris, not to mention an extremely civilized way of being, Roho ya Selous has a pretty location in the Selous Game Reserve.

 

And if you really hate safari (seriously, are you sure?Matemwe Lodge and Matemwe Retreat are laid-back spots on Zanzibar, where you can cheerfully spend a week or so snoozing beside the Indian Ocean.

The fine print:

  • Travel before May 2021.
  • Valid for any nationality with proof of work ID card showing name/job description – e.g. doctors, nurses, paramedics, elderly care home workers, pharmacists, ambulance drivers etc.
  • Discount valid for one partner or friend sharing a room.
  • Children aged 5-18 travelling with healthcare workers will be charged resident’s child rates.
  • Flights, park fees and other government fees charged as normal.
  • Postponements due to Covid-19 will be possible within the same rules as the company’s Covid-19 policy, with the only additional requirement to not rebook new postponed dates in high or peak season if new dates fall after 1 June 2021, due to the level of discount applied on this offer.

FAQS….

  •  COSTS- all of our trips are completely tailor-made, so there are no fixed prices or fixed packages. However, to give you a general ballpark figure to start from, a 4 night safari at Mara Bush Homes plus 4 nights on Zanzibar  costs from around £9,000 for a family of 4 using the special offer, excluding international flights. This would cost about £14,000-£17,500 normally.
  • 10 days on safari in Northern Tanzania using the special would cost around £4,600 per adult excluding international flights.
  • A week’s safari in Southern Tanzania using the special offer costs from around £2,800 per adult excluding international flights. Normal price would be £5,200-£6,900 per person.
  • CHILDREN most of these camps have a lower age limit of 5, except for the Mara Bush Homes, the ultra luxury private villa at Jabali Ridge, and the private house on the beach at Matemwe which are totally private and have no lower age limit. As parents ourselves, we think we’d be very unlikely to take children much under 3 on safari.

Want to know more? Just contact us

The rewards and challenges of being a porter on Mt Kilimanjaro

We interviewed the wonderful Cathbert Cosmas who has been a porter on Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania for the past eight years.  Porters do the most incredible job of ferrying climbers’ food and equipment up the mountain while expertly guiding the group,  helping set up camp each night, and cooking hearty meals to boost you up the next part of the climb.    Often, a porter’s job can be incredibly tough and you will come across porters up the mountain wearing just flip flops, surviving on very little food and water, and with a distinct lack of decent clothing or sleeping equipment often working for very little or no money at all.  In order to combat these difficult working conditions, KPAP (Kilimanjaro Porters Assistance Project) are working hard to improve conditions for the porters and we are very proud to be working alongside KPAP ensuring that the porters we use enjoy fair working conditions, pay and treatment.
Read on to find out more about this physically taxing yet hugely rewarding job as well as hearing more about the wonders of climbing Mount Kilimanjaro – maybe it’ll even inspire you to include a trip to Kili on your next trip to Africa!

Cathbert Cosmas

How did you start out as a porter?
Actually there is no any training involved for a person to become a porter. I actually found it as a job and started as a porter without any training.
What are your favourite parts of your job?
My favourite part is to see animals in the wild but also interacting with other co-workers sharing some experiences and to do the best of my job as a porter. Also mixing up with different people with different stories.

Climbers at the summit

What sort of wildlife do you normally see during a Kili climb?
Blue monkey – Primate concentration are highest in the clouded forest at the base of the mountain.
Colobus Monkey – These beautiful monkey have a distinctive black and white colouring with a long bushy tail.
Birdlife – Malachite Sunbird,  these stunningly beautiful birds have a distinctive bright metallic green colouring and small scarlet patch on their chest and can often been seen hooking their long beaks into giant lobelias to extract the nector. Mountain Buzzards, Crowned Eagles and rare Lamergeyer Giant Vulture.
Honey Badgers.
Large Mammals – this include Buffaloes
Four-striped Grass Mouse.
NOTE: The further up the mountain you go,  the less wildlife there is.
Have you had any close calls with wildlife?
No. I had never come across with such situation on the mountain. But sometimes i actually hear stories from some of my co-workers.

Colobus Monkey

What are the challenges of your job?
This depend on your experience but the main challenge will be the altitude and lack of oxygen and how you personally adapt to these changes. The most challenges of my job include the following:
Lack of sleep in sometimes in different camps,  experience rain,  huge wind,  cold all in one week,  extreme altitude above 5500m/18044 feet, high UV level from the sun.
Which is your favourite mountain to climb and why?
Mt. Kilimanjaro is my favourite mountain to climb. This is because it’s situated in my home country of which I like to promote tourism in my country. Secondly it possesses good environmental attraction together with unique species found only in such mountain.

View across to Mt Kilimanjaro

What do you enjoy doing on your days off?
I do enjoy making interaction with some of my neighbours and friends changing ideas and some experience of life from each other,  also reading novels  and having some body exercise at home.
How do you ensure responsible tourism for your Kili climbs?
> Through making optimal use of environmental resources that constitute a key element in tourism development.
> Through maintaining essential ecological processes and helping to conserve natural heritage and biodiversity.
> Also through respecting  socio-cultural authenticity of host communities,  conserve their built and living cultural heritage and traditional values and contribute to inter-cultural understanding and tolerance. Because tourism is the socio interaction of different people and communities.
With huge thanks for Cathbert Cosmas for taking the time to give us an insight into his working life.

A personal letter from our founder

A few weeks ago, I was subject to a rather gruelling interrogation from an old friend. “Why should I travel with Extraordinary Africa?” he asked.  Given that we’ve known each other since we were 19, I’d hoped the answer would be obvious.  But then, I probably should’ve known better than to strike up a business conversation with a management consultant. This letter began as an email to him, explaining why Africa’s so wonderful and why I think Extraordinary Africa delivers just that.

“These are my personal African highlights, so please forgive any lack of professionalism in the photography!

Africa isn’t trendy and it’s rarely “now”. It’s far, far better than that. You might have seen photos of a million ravishing sunsets, but when it’s you perched on the bonnet of your Landrover, sundowner in hand, each quiet moment of peace is uniquely its own. Lions do run across vast, spreading, golden plains, just like the wildlife documentaries show. But when it’s you they’re running towards, the last thing you’re thinking is that it’s some boring cliché that you’ve already seen on TV.  When you see a shooting star- and grab the hand of the person next to you, just because that’s what you do- just try saying it was frankly rather dull and has been done a thousand times before.  Visiting Africa just isn’t like any other holiday.

There are hundreds of companies that organise holidays to Africa. But so many of them churn out the same old templates, that don’t do the continent, or their customers, justice. Because Africa isn’t standard, and because people are never the same, I didn’t want to organise the standard holidays. Sometimes following the rules or logistics makes life cheaper, or easier, but if that’s not what you want, then it’s not what you’ll do.  I want to show you the magic that I feel, in a way that works for you.  The idea behind Extraordinary Africa is to set your soul on fire, make it an utter delight for you to arrange, and leave you dreaming of more.  We hope to leave you charmed and excited, full of enthusiasm before your adventure, and remembering it wistfully afterwards.

Anyway- that’s my vision. I want to show you Africa my way, but whatever else happens, please make sure you go, each corner of it is so utterly wonderful, I couldn’t bear for you to miss out.

Alex”